Showing posts with label ISP speed index. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ISP speed index. Show all posts

Monday, July 14, 2014

Netflix ISP Speed Index for June

We have added June data to the Netflix ISP Speed Index, our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best prime time Netflix streaming experience.

With this month’s update, we also have included icons in the U.S. graph to increase transparency about the type of technology used by an ISP. This should make it easier to compare Netflix performance on different types of networks.

Here are some data points from this month's update:

  • US: Among the major ISPs, Cablevision, Cox and Suddenlink continue to lead the index and show steady improvements over the last three months. Meanwhile Verizon FiOS continued its decline, dropping another two spots to No. 12. Both Verizon FiOS and AT&T U-Verse rank behind DSL offerings from Frontier, Windstream and Centurylink.

  • Canada: After breaking out DSL and fiber from MTS and Sasktel, fiber networks of both providers ranked high in performance, with MTS Fiber taking the third spot and Sasktel Fiber coming in fifth.

  • Latin America: Telecentro retained the top spot in Argentina, increasing its performance by almost 1 full Mbps, rising to 3.26 Mbps from 2.35 Mbps.

  • Europe: While there was no significant change at the top of the rankings, Virgin Media in the UK did expand its lead over BT as the No. 1 ranked provider.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 48 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance during primetime of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: The average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

The latest regional rankings are below.

Anne Marie

Anne Marie Squeo is a member of the Netflix communications team.






Monday, June 9, 2014

Netflix ISP Speed Index for May

We have just added May data to the Netflix ISP Speed Index, our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best prime time Netflix streaming experience.


The Netflix ISP Speed Index aims to provide transparency and help consumers understand the Internet access they’re actually getting from their ISP. The average Netflix stream is about 2 Mbps (with most streams ranging from 256Kbps to 5.8Mbps), a fraction of the bandwidth most consumers purchase from their broadband provider. Still, in some cases, people are unable to enjoy a high quality Netflix experience.


As part of this transparency campaign, we started a small scale test in early May that lets consumers know, while they’re watching Netflix, that their experience is degraded due to a lack of capacity into their broadband provider’s network. We are testing this across the U.S. wherever there is significant and persistent network congestion This test is scheduled to end on June 16. We will evaluate rolling it out more broadly.


Some broadband providers argue that our actions, and not theirs, are causing a degraded Netflix experience. Netflix does not purposely select congested routes. We pay some of the world’s largest transit networks to deliver Netflix video right to the front door of an ISP. Where the problem occurs is at that door -- the interconnection point -- when the broadband provider hasn’t provided enough capacity to accommodate the traffic their customer requested.


Some large US ISPs are erecting toll booths, providing sufficient capacity for services requested by their subscribers to flow through only when those services pay the toll. In this way, ISPs are double-dipping by getting both their subscribers and Internet content providers to pay for access to each other. We believe these ISP tolls are wrong because they raise costs, stifle innovation and harm consumers. ISPs should provide sufficient capacity into their network to provide consumers the broadband experience for which they pay.


Here are some data points from the May update of the Netflix ISP Speed Index:


The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 48 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.


Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.


The latest regional rankings are below.


Joris


Joris Evers is part of the communications team at Netflix






Monday, May 12, 2014

April Netflix ISP Speed Index Adds Canada

We have just added April data to the Netflix ISP Speed Index, our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best primetime Netflix streaming experience.

With this month’s update we have expanded the index to include Canada. Perhaps not surprisingly, the fiber services from Bell Aliant and Bell Canada top the chart, closely followed by cable provider Shaw. As a country, the average speed for Netflix in Canada beats that of the United States, but ranks below most European nations.

A few additional data points from the April update of the Netflix ISP Speed Index:

  • In the US, the average speed on the Comcast network for Netflix streams continues to increase, averaging 2.77Mbps in April. Comcast now has the third slot in our major ISP ranking, behind Cablevision - Optimum and COX. 
  • In Latin America, Telecentro has taken the lead in Argentina, unseating Claro, while in Costa Rica Tigo Star has passed Japi for the top spot and in Ecuador TV Cable ceded the lead to Telconet. 
  • In Europe we saw continued improvement on Telenor ISPs in Denmark, Norway and Sweden while in Ireland we saw increased performance on UPC.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 48 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

The latest regional rankings are below.

Joris

Joris Evers is part of the communications team at Netflix





Thursday, April 24, 2014

The Case Against ISP Tolls

As the person at Netflix responsible for content delivery, I spend a lot of time thinking about Netflix’s Open Connect CDN and its interconnection with ISPs. We are proud of the performance we’ve achieved through our hundreds of Open Connect partners around the globe.

In fact, Netflix has a mutually beneficial relationship with nearly every ISP in every market where we provide service. But this is less the case for the largest ISP in the U.S., Comcast, which is trying to become even larger by acquiring Time Warner Cable.

Netflix agreed to pay Comcast for direct interconnection to reverse an unacceptable decline in our members’ video experience on the Comcast network. These members were experiencing poor streaming quality because Comcast allowed its links to Internet transit providers like Level3, XO, Cogent and Tata to clog up, slowing delivery of movies and TV shows to Netflix users.

For a content company such as Netflix, paying an ISP like Comcast for interconnection is not the same as paying for Internet transit. Transit networks like Level3, XO, Cogent and Tata perform two important services: (1) they carry traffic over long distances and (2) they provide access to every network on the global Internet. When Netflix connects directly to the Comcast network, Comcast is not providing either of the services typically provided by transit networks.


Comcast does not carry Netflix traffic over long distances. Netflix is itself shouldering the costs and performing the transport function for which it used to pay transit providers. Netflix connects to Comcast in locations all over the U.S., and has offered to connect in as many locations as Comcast desires. So Netflix is moving Netflix content long distances, not Comcast.

Nor does Comcast connect Netflix to other networks. In fact, Netflix can’t reach other networks via Comcast’s network.

For all these reasons, Netflix directly interconnects with many ISPs here in the U.S. and internationally without any exchange of fees.

In sum, Comcast is not charging Netflix for transit service. It is charging Netflix for access to its subscribers. Comcast also charges its subscribers for access to Internet content providers like Netflix. In this way, Comcast is double dipping by getting both its subscribers and Internet content providers to pay for access to each other.

It is true that there is competition among the transit providers and CDNs that transport and localize data across networks. But even the most competitive transit market cannot ensure sufficient access to the Comcast network. That’s because, to reach consumers, CDNs and transit providers must ultimately hand the traffic over to a terminating ISP like Comcast, which faces no competition. Put simply, there is one and only one way to reach Comcast’s subscribers at the last mile: Comcast.

There cannot be an “intensely competitive” market when Comcast alone sets the terms and conditions for access to Comcast subscribers. Comcast can simply refuse to provide capacity to any network at any time, constraining the ability for Comcast users to use the services they want. Comcast’s ability to constrain access to Netflix can be clearly seen in the following chart, which shows how Netflix performance deteriorated on the Comcast network and then immediately recovered after Netflix started paying Comcast in February.


We do a great deal of work at Netflix to provide our users with great video quality whenever they chose to use our service. Comcast already controls access and sets the terms of access to a substantial portion of people who connect to the Internet in the United States. We're very concerned that a combined Comcast-TWC will place toll taking above consumer interests and will use their combined market power to the detriment of a vibrant and efficient Internet. That’s why Netflix opposes the merger.

Ken

Ken Florance is vice president of content delivery at Netflix

Monday, April 14, 2014

Netflix ISP Speed Index for March

We have just added March data to the Netflix ISP Speed Index, our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience during primetime.

This month’s rankings are a great illustration of how performance can improve when ISPs work to connect directly to Netflix. In the US, the average speed on the Comcast network for Netflix streams is up 65 percent from 1.51Mbps in January to 2.5Mbps in March.

We’re also seeing early improvements on Telenor-owned ISPs in Norway, Sweden and Denmark after Telenor agreed to directly connect its network to Netflix.

We are dedicated to delivering a great streaming experience and invest in continually improving that experience. Part of that investment is working with ISPs to make Netflix delivery easy and to avoid congestion. We see consistently better speeds for customers served by ISPs that directly connect their network to Netflix using our Open Connect content delivery network.


A few additional data points from the February update of the Netflix ISP Speed Index:
  • We have expanded the ISP Speed Index with six more countries in Latin America: Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Panama, Peru and Uruguay. Consumers there now also have a simple way to see which ISPs provide the best Netflix streaming experience. The data also allows easy country-to-country comparisons: Uruguay tops the region while Costa Rica is last of the 11 ranked nations. 
  • In Sweden, Com Hem has taken the top slot, unseating Own It for the first time.
The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 44 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is part of the corporate communications team at Netflix

UPDATE: Blog was corrected at 11:45AM to reflect accurate average Comcast speed in January. It was 1.51Mpbs. 

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Internet Tolls And The Case For Strong Net Neutrality

The Internet is improving lives everywhere – democratizing access to ideas, services and goods. To ensure the Internet remains humanity's most important platform for progress, net neutrality must be defended and strengthened.

The essence of net neutrality is that ISPs such as AT&T and Comcast don't restrict, influence or otherwise meddle with the choices consumers make. The traditional form of net neutrality which was recently overturned by a Verizon lawsuit is important, but insufficient.

This weak net neutrality isn't enough to protect an open, competitive Internet; a stronger form of net neutrality is required. Strong net neutrality additionally prevents ISPs from charging a toll for interconnection to services like Netflix, YouTube, or Skype, or intermediaries such as Cogent, Akamai or Level 3, to deliver the services and data requested by ISP residential subscribers. Instead, they must provide sufficient access to their network without charge.



Some major ISPs, like Cablevision, already practice strong net neutrality and for their broadband subscribers, the quality of Netflix and other streaming services is outstanding. But on other big ISPs, due to a lack of sufficient interconnectivity, Netflix performance has been constrained, subjecting consumers who pay a lot of money for high-speed Internet to high buffering rates, long wait times and poor video quality. A recent Wall Street Journal article chronicled this degradation using our public data.

Once Netflix agrees to pay the ISP interconnection fees, however, sufficient capacity is made available and high quality service for consumers is restored. If this kind of leverage is effective against Netflix, which is pretty large, imagine the plight of smaller services today and in the future. Roughly the same arbitrary tax is demanded from the intermediaries such as Cogent and Level 3, who supply millions of websites with connectivity, leading to a poor consumer experience.

Without strong net neutrality, big ISPs can demand potentially escalating fees for the interconnection required to deliver high quality service. The big ISPs can make these demands -- driving up costs and prices for everyone else -- because of their market position. For any given U.S. household, there is often only one or two choices for getting high-speed Internet* access and that’s unlikely to change. Furthermore, Internet access is often bundled with other services making it challenging to switch ISPs. It is this lack of consumer choice that leads to the need for strong net neutrality.

Netflix believes strong net neutrality is critical, but in the near term we will in cases pay the toll to the powerful ISPs to protect our consumer experience. When we do so, we don’t pay for priority access against competitors, just for interconnection. A few weeks ago, we agreed to pay Comcast and our members are now getting a good experience again. Comcast has been an industry leader in supporting weak net neutrality, and we hope they’ll support strong net neutrality as well.

ISPs sometimes point to data showing that Netflix members account for about 30% of peak residential Internet traffic, so the ISPs want us to share in their costs. But they don't also offer for Netflix or similar services to share in the ISPs revenue, so cost-sharing makes no sense. When an ISP sells a consumer a 10 or 50 megabits-per-second Internet package, the consumer should get that rate, no matter where the data is coming from.

Some ISPs say that Netflix is unilaterally "dumping as much volume" (Verizon CFO) as it wants onto their networks. Netflix isn't "dumping" data; it's satisfying requests made by ISP customers who pay a lot of money for high speed Internet. Netflix doesn't send data unless members request a movie or TV show.

Interestingly, there is one special case where no-fee interconnection is embraced by the big ISPs -- when they are connecting among themselves. They argue this is because roughly the same amount of data comes and goes between their networks. But when we ask them if we too would qualify for no-fee interconnect if we changed our service to upload as much data as we download** -- thus filling their upstream networks and nearly doubling our total traffic -- there is an uncomfortable silence. That's because the ISP argument isn't sensible. Big ISPs aren't paying money to services like online backup that generate more upstream than downstream traffic. Data direction, in other words, has nothing to do with costs.

ISPs around the world are investing in high-speed Internet and most already practice strong net neutrality. With strong net neutrality, new services requiring high-speed Internet can emerge and become popular, spurring even more demand for the lucrative high-speed packages ISPs offer. With strong net neutrality, everyone avoids the kind of brinkmanship over blackouts that plague the cable industry and harms consumers. As the Wall Street Journal chart shows, we're already getting to the brownout stage. Consumers deserve better.

Some big ISPs are extracting a toll because they can -- they effectively control access to millions of consumers and are willing to sacrifice the interests of their own customers to press Netflix and others to pay. Though they have the scale and power to do this, they should realize it is in their long term interest to back strong net neutrality. While in the short term Netflix will in cases reluctantly pay large ISPs to ensure a high quality member experience, we will continue to fight for the Internet the world needs and deserves.

Reed

*Defined as 10 Mbits/sec -- sufficient for a good Skype video, an MLB.tv live game or high quality Netflix streaming. DSL and mobile do not generally offer these speeds.
**in other words, moving to peer-to-peer content delivery

Monday, March 10, 2014

Netflix ISP Speed Index Expanded

We have just added February data to the Netflix ISP Speed Index, our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience during primetime. This month we have expanded our list of ISPs in the United States to the top 60, providing more details on the performance of US ISPs.

Since we started publishing the ISP Speed Index in December 2012 we have tracked the largest broadband providers in the US plus Google Fiber, the guiding North Star for broadband performance in the country. With the expansion, Google Fiber continues to be at the top of the expanded list of ISPs, but Cablevision – Optimum leads the major ISPs.

We expanded the list to provide insight into the performance of many of the smaller providers in the US and to give credit where it is due. For example, Midcontinent, a regional cable provider in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, takes second place in the expanded rankings.

A few additional data points from the February update of the Netflix ISP Speed Index:

  • In the US there were no big shifts in the major ISP rankings in February. We do expect to see Comcast’s performance improve in the rankings next month when we release March data as a result of the recent agreement between Netflix and Comcast
  • In Mexico we now break out Axtel – Extremo, a fiber service, and Axtel Acceso Universal, a WiMAX service. With this break out, Axtel - Extremo lands firmly at the top of broadband providers in Mexico. Elsewhere in Latin America there were no big changes.
  • In the Netherlands UPC left the bottom ranked slot and climbed three spaces, passing Tele2, Online and XS4ALL. In the UK Virgin Media saw its top slot taken over by BT while Com Hem in Sweden and Get in Norway each climbed two spots to land in second place in their respective countries. Elsewhere in Europe there were no major ranking shifts.
The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 44 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Below is our current ranking of regional ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of communications at Netflix



Monday, February 10, 2014

Brazil, Chile Lead In Broadband in Latin America

We have just added January data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience during primetime. With this update we have also added Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Colombia to our rankings.

Netflix has been available throughout Latin America since September 2011. Broadband quality in the region has been improving since we launched and trends are headed in the right direction, except in Argentina where we see average speeds declining.

Brazil and Chile lead in providing the best experience in Latin America, followed by Colombia. These three countries provide average speeds that are higher than in the United States, which over the past months is seeing a downward trend in average speeds.

A few additional data points from the January update of the Netflix ISP Speed Index:

  • In Latin America, GVT in Brazil and GTD in Chile are consistently the fastest broadband providers. Both are examples of innovative ISPs that invest in new network technology and strive to optimize the experience for their customers.
  • In the US, Verizon (FiOS and DSL), AT&T U-verse and Mediacom slipped in the rankings while Time Warner Cable, Bright House, Windstream, Centurylink and Clearwire saw gains.
  • In Europe there were no major ranking shifts, but in Denmark, Norway and Sweden speeds on already low-ranked Telenor operated ISPs dropped further in January.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 44 million Netflix members worldwide who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Below is our current ranking of regional ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix



Monday, January 13, 2014

New ISP Performance Data For December

We have just added December data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience during primetime.

Noteworthy in December:
  • Performance was up in all countries, except the US and Mexico. The US is now essentially at par with Ireland and slightly above Mexico in the bottom of the country-by-country averages.
  • In the US, Cablevision, Cox and Suddenlink continued to show performance increases, while Bright House and Comcast tumbled five spots and other ISPs such as Verizon and Time Warner Cable also showed slower averages compared to last month.
  • ISPs in The Netherlands continued to offer the best Netflix connectivity.
  • Virgin Media in the UK extended its lead, while Everything Everywhere replaced Talk Talk in the last spot on the UK ranking. There was no change in Ireland, where Magnet continues to lead.
  • No major changes in the Nordic region. Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland continue to show strong Netflix performance.
  • Megacable in Mexico increased its lead over the other ISPs, but there was no ranking change.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 40 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is well below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Below is our current ranking of regional ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix


Monday, December 9, 2013

Netherlands Tops Netflix ISP Speed Index

We have just added November data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience. With this update, we also added the Netherlands to our rankings.

We launched Netflix in the Netherlands three months ago and have always known that the Dutch have great broadband. That's now confirmed by the Netflix ISP Speed Index: with a country average of 3.16Mbps the Netherlands takes a firm lead compared to the other nations in the index. No other country crosses 3Mbps, but runners up Sweden and Denmark come close with 2.83Mbps and 2.8Mbps, respectively.

Looking at the bottom rankings, Mexico ranks last, just below Ireland and the US.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 40 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix each month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network. A faster network generally means a better picture quality, quicker start times and fewer interruptions.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Below is our current ranking of US ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Monday, November 11, 2013

New: Netflix Prime Time ISP Performance Metrics

Our members watch well over a billion hours of Netflix a month. Most of that streaming happens during prime time. Starting with the October update to the Netflix ISP Speed Index published today, we’re reporting prime time performance metrics, so you know which Internet service providers (ISPs) deliver the best Netflix experience when it matters most.

Prime time is the equivalent of rush hour on the Internet. This can lead to congestion on the network, just like physical traffic can on roads. When watching Netflix, network congestion can manifest itself as buffering, lower video quality or longer start-up times.

This graphic shows how important the effect of network congestion during prime time can be on the viewing experience. ISP speeds are consistently much better for customers served by ISPs that directly connect their network to Netflix using our Open Connect content delivery network. This performance difference is even more evident during prime time.


We are proud that Netflix is one of the most popular Internet applications. Netflix is one of the primary reasons people sign up for broadband and upgrade to premium broadband tiers.

We are dedicated to delivering a great streaming experience and invest in continually improving that experience. Part of that investment is working with ISPs to make Netflix delivery easy and to avoid congestion. Through Open Connect, our purpose-built content delivery network, we help broadband providers make it easy to deliver Netflix video at no cost to them.


Note: The Netflix ISP Speed Index reflects the average speed as measured by Netflix streaming activity. The average speed will differ from the theoretical maximum speed an ISP advertises because of the various video bitrates and the various devices our members use to watch Netflix. Still the average provides a great indication of an ISPs ability to deliver a great Netflix experience.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Monday, October 14, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index Gets A Fresh Look

We have just added September data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing our monthly update on which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience. With this update, we also refreshed the look of our monthly rankings, adding a gradient to the leaderboards to better show performance differences.


In case you missed it, on Sept. 26 we made the highest quality HD streams available to all Netflix members, regardless of their Internet service provider. We initially made these "Super HD" streams available only through ISPs with a direct connection to Netflix. We don't expect the broader availability to substantially change the rankings. ISPs with a direct Netflix connection will continue to deliver the best Netflix experience.

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 37 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Highest Quality HD Now Available To All Netflix Members

All Netflix members, regardless of their Internet service provider (ISP), now have access to the highest quality HD streams available on Netflix.

This means that the great TV shows and movies on Netflix will look even better on HD screens with a higher bit rate stream, Super HD, that applies less compression to the 1080p image.

We initially rolled out Super HD in January only through ISPs with a direct connection to Netflix. Based on the performance data we’ve seen, and in response to member requests, we are now expanding availability to give all our members the ability to enjoy Netflix in the best possible quality.

Netflix uses “adaptive streaming” to dynamically adjust the video quality based on the available bandwidth. This means that the ability to receive Super HD depends on broadband quality and performance. Netflix members who subscribe to an ISP with a direct Netflix connection will get the best experience. Find out more about ISP performance by consulting the Netflix ISP Speed Index.

We continue to encourage ISPs to adopt Netflix Open Connect, our highly optimized video content delivery network. Open Connect is available at no cost to ISPs and is designed to deliver the best possible Netflix experience by storing the TV shows and movies Netflix members want to watch as close to them as possible.

Note that HD and Super HD are only available on certain titles and can only be displayed on devices that support HD. More detail is available in the Netflix Help Center.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Monday, September 9, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index Adds Global Averages

We just added August data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience.

We have also expanded the ISP Speed Index Web site with historical country averages, showing the average performance of the Internet as measured by Netflix in all the countries we rank. Three Scandinavian countries top the rankings, but the UK battles Norway for No. 4. The U.S., Ireland and Mexico are much lower in the rankings.

In case you missed it, on Aug. 31 we released our first ever Regional Netflix ISP Speed Index Snapshot. We picked greater Boston to show how small broadband providers, in this case RCN, deliver an experience that outperformed other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) by as much as 70%.

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 37 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Saturday, August 31, 2013

Small Internet Service Providers Deliver Big Netflix Experience

Today we published our first ever Regional Netflix ISP Speed Index Snapshot, showing that in the greater Boston area no Internet service provider (ISP) comes close to delivering as great a Netflix experience as RCN.

In the second quarter of 2013, the average speeds for Netflix streams on the RCN network in Boston outperformed other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) by as much as 70%. This means that those Netflix members who were also RCN customers enjoyed better picture quality, quicker access to their favorite TV shows and movies, and more reliable playback delivered via the Internet from Netflix, especially during peak viewing hours.



This is useful information for consumers when picking an ISP, especially for those thousands of university students who are moving to Boston before school begins. When it comes to getting a great Internet connection, it is clear that a bigger ISP isn’t always a better ISP. In Boston, RCN delivers a very impressive connection, offering equal or better quality than fiber to the home.

Our Regional Netflix ISP Speed Index Snapshot is an extension of the Netflix ISP Speed Index, a Web site we launched in March that provides monthly rankings of large domestic and international ISPs based on Netflix performance. Our ISP Speed Index is based on actual data from Netflix members. It is an average of all Netflix streams and an indicator of real world performance experienced on an ISP network.

We expect to publish more regional snapshots in the future and we'll highlight certain markets to showcase where ISPs are delivering a great Netflix experience to consumers. Often these ISPs don't meet the criteria for our national rankings, so we have a chance to show off their performance in these regional snapshots.

Greg

Greg Peters is chief streaming and partnerships officer at Netflix

Monday, August 12, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index For July

We just added July data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience. Below is our updated chart for U.S. ISPs.

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 36 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix

Monday, July 8, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index for June

We just added June data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience.

A few data points from the new Netflix ISP Speed Index, reflecting data for June:

  • U.S.: The top rankings remain unchanged.  Optimum continues to provide the best Netflix experience of any large ISP, for the sixth consecutive month.  Lower in the rankings, Time Warner Cable moves up to the eighth spot, at the expense of Mediacom and AT&T U-verse, which both drop a notch.
  • U.K: All ISPs in the UK delivered improvements in speed in June compared to May, continuing an upward speed trend. There was no change in rankings, however, with Virgin holding on to its top position.
  • Ireland: Speed increases across ISPs in Ireland, but no change in the ranking with Magnet solidly on top and UPC staying on No. 5 after a three spot drop last month.
  • Nordics:  In Norway NextGenTel jumped three spots to No. 6 while Sweden’s OwnIt set a Nordic Netflix ISP Speed Index record at 3.04 Mbps, closely followed by KYMP in Finland as the only other Nordic ISP to break the 3.00 Mbps barrier. In Denmark Stofa rocketed higher in the ranking.
  • Mexico: Speeds increased for all providers, giving Netflix members who use those ISPs a better experience.
Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 36 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix



Monday, June 10, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index for May

We just added May data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience.

A few data points from the new Netflix ISP Speed Index, reflecting data for May:
  • U.S.: The top rankings remain unchanged, but the top five ISPs all delivered slightly faster averages. Optimum continues to provide the best Netflix experience of any large ISP, followed by COX. 
  • U.K: No change in rankings with Virgin holding on to its top position. All ISPs in the UK delivered improvements in speed in May compared to April. 
  • Ireland: UPC dropped three spots to No. 4 while Magnet maintains its No. 1 slot and continues to be the ISP with the best Netflix performance. Runner Digiweb, Eircom and Vodafone showed slight speed increases. 
  • Nordics: Average speeds went up for each country. The Nordics continue to have the fastest ISPs, led by Ownit in Sweden. In Norway Altibox jumped back to the No. 1 slot 
  • Mexico: Speeds increased for the top three providers, giving Netflix members who use those ISPs a better experience.

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 36 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris

Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix



Monday, May 13, 2013

Netflix ISP Speed Index for April

We just added April data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience.

A few data points from the new Netflix ISP Speed Index, reflecting data for April:

  • In the U.S.: Cablevision Optimum continues to provide the best Netflix experience of any large ISP, with average speeds increasing slightly in April to 2.41 Mbps, meanwhile Verizon FiOS and Comcast dropped a notch in the ranking, being passed by Charter and Mediacom, respectively. 
  • In the U.K.: the top four was unchanged while TalkTalk was left in last place after EverythingEverywhere showed increased performance.
  • In Ireland: Magnet maintains its No. 1 slot and continues to be the ISP with the best Netflix performance, thought runners up UPC and Digiweb showed slight speed increases. 
  • The Nordics continue to show off high quality broadband with top speeds across the board, led by Sweden’s Ownit. In Denmark: ComX challenges the dominance of Waoo. 
  • Speeds in Mexico increased for all providers, giving Netflix members a better experience, but the overall ranking did not change.

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 36 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris
Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix




Monday, April 8, 2013

Updated ISP Speed Index for March

We just added March data to the “Netflix ISP Speed Index,” providing an updated look at which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide the best Netflix streaming experience.

A few data points from the new Netflix ISP Speed Index, reflecting data for March:

  • At 3.45 Mbps, Google Fiber in the U.S. provides the highest average Netflix streaming bitrate anywhere Netflix is available, slightly increasing its average over last month
  • After Google Fiber, Sweden’s Ownit continues to deliver the highest average Netflix bitrate at 2.95 Mbps Netflix members in Finland receive, on average, the highest bitrates, while members in Mexico have the slowest connections, on average 
  • In the U.S., Cox Communications continues a steady climb and enters the top three of ISPs that provide the best Netflix experience 
  • In Norway Get has jumped to take the lead after two months of strong increases 
  • In Ireland Magnet has solidified its lead, showing a strong performance in March with an increased average while runner up UPC saw a lower average

Located at http://ISPSpeedIndex.Netflix.com/ the Netflix ISP Speed Index provides an easy overview of the performance of ISPs in several of the countries Netflix is available in. Updated on a monthly basis, the site allows for easy comparison of ISPs in a country as well as international comparisons. At launch the Netflix ISP Speed Index includes data for the U.S., Mexico, Ireland, U.K., Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is based on data from the more than 33 million Netflix members who view over 1 billion hours of TV shows and movies streaming from Netflix per month. The listed speeds reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISP's network and are an indicator of the performance typically experienced across all users on an ISP network.

Note: the average performance is below the peak performance due to many factors including the variety of encodes Netflix uses to deliver the TV shows and movies as well as the variety of devices members use and home network conditions. These factors cancel out when comparing across ISPs.

Joris
Joris Evers is director of corporate communications at Netflix