Friday, November 12, 2010

Netflix on Android


Hi, this is Greg Peters, from Netflix product development. We recently announced the availability of Netflix on Windows Phone 7 devices, which, alongside the iPhone, represents the second mobile phone platform we have enabled for streaming from Netflix. Notably absent from current supported mobile devices is Android and I wanted to provide an update on where things stand with this important platform.

We regard Android as an exciting technology that drives a range of great devices that our members could use to instantly watch TV shows and movies from Netflix. We are eager to launch on these devices and are disappointed that we haven’t been able to do so already. The hurdle has been the lack of a generic and complete platform security and content protection mechanism available for Android. The same security issues that have led to piracy concerns on the Android platform have made it difficult for us to secure a common Digital Rights Management (DRM) system on these devices. Setting aside the debate around the value of content protection and DRM, they are requirements we must fulfill in order to obtain content from major studios for our subscribers to enjoy. Although we don’t have a common platform security mechanism and DRM, we are able to work with individual handset manufacturers to add content protection to their devices. Unfortunately, this is a much slower approach and leads to a fragmented experience on Android, in which some handsets will have access to Netflix and others won’t. This clearly is not the preferred solution, and we regret the confusion it might create for consumers. However, we believe that providing the service for some Android device owners is better than denying it to everyone.

We live to get Netflix on new devices, so the current lack of an Android-generic approach to quickly get to all Android devices is frustrating. But I’m happy to announce we’ll launch select Android devices that will instantly stream from Netflix early next year. We will also continue to work with the Android community, handset manufacturers, carriers, and other service providers to develop a standard, platform-wide solution that allows content providers to deliver their services to all Android-based devices. I’ll keep you updated on our progress.

954 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Very glad to see it coming, but as a developer, I'm not sure I understand what the differences are between the platforms...

    The same security concerns come with iPhone and likely WinPhone7, as soon as the community gets a hold of it.

    Is this app related security or the stream itself?

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  3. I can imagine these are not easy challenges to overcome. Thank you for the update, eagerly awaiting netflix on android! I'm curious whether the DRM for specific devices will be supportable in third party ROMs.

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  4. As long as the HTC Evo is one of those devices - we good.

    Otherwise I'm going to continue to be angry about the lack of netflix on my linux box.

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  5. hmm. open enough to run bittorrent, or closed enough to run netflix? go android go!

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  6. Hi again, Greg Peters. Perhaps you can tell me:

    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?
    Where are my Lists?


    How many times do you need to be asked before we can expect to answered?
    C'mon... Where are my Lists?

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  7. Security? You really need to hire some better Android Developers, it's really not that hard and even WP7 is less secure than Android. C'mon, this is why I ended my subscription, it's a shame too.

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  8. If that's why you ended your subscription, then why are you trolling?

    Android's fragmentation is a real issue. Let's hope they do something sooner than later.

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  9. Don't forget about the Pre! And PalmPad! I mean, we better have a way of watching Netflix on our printers & toasters

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  10. So, just to make sure I am understanding this correctly...

    The Android Netflix Player has been delayed because there is too much freedom on that platform?

    Interesting...

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  11. Alright, now that you have all the devices covered, how about ADDING MORE CONTENT?!? Especially in Canada where all we get is old movies and really bad movies and theres really only a handful, just about everything I look for is "Not Available".

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  12. Hmm, smells of PR spin to me. Which is to say it doesn't sound very believable. There are dozens of applications on the Android platform for streaming services, I would say it is probably pretty possible. I think its far more likely that your company made a decision what to prioritize and that wasn't Android. As an Android user, I'm fine with that - you have to keep a lot of people happy. There won't be an serious demand for Netflix on Android until they get bigger, tablet-class devices and that's a bit off. In the meantime, since you gave Sony and Nintendo bones with the Dolby announcement you needed to give Microsoft one with Windows Phone 7. And Google just got the Google TV app which is arguably more of a selling point for you guys. As an Xbox 360 user I'd rather have the Dolby but I imagine there are absurd licensing/backroom deals that cause all of this. I think the post was to appease Android users but it is pretty hollow. This post has done more do damage my opinion of Netflix than anything your organization has ever done.

    On the topic of Canada sure give them more content. While you're doing that though if you could smuggle the last couple of seasons of Corner Gas onto your streaming service down here in the former colonies that'd be great!

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  13. HTC Evo should be first....since it was the first 4G phone on the market. :-)

    but thanks for giving an update on the android systems!

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  14. Just wanted to leave a suggestion-- It would be great if there were a "chat" feature on netflix so that users could communicate and/or leave messages in terms of film reviews and suggestions.

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  15. Looks like me it has nothing with drm it's more of deals with Microsoft to hold off.

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  16. What a complete load of crap. WP7 is less secure than Android and has an app out of the box.

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  17. Thanks. Nifty. Groovy.

    Now, if you could just manage to get the site working on, you know, the regular old Interwebs today, that would be even groovier. Or is it "more groovy"?

    I digress.

    Site's been down for a few hours now so, yeah, Android-Schmandroid ...

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  18. Dear Netflix
    What is with the bait and switch - showing a $7.99 online rate structure on the homepage, but then only allowing a minimum of $8.99 (includes one dvd at a time) after input of identification and credit information. Extremely uncool and very unprofessional, Netflix! You should be ashamed of such tactics.
    Unhappy

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  19. I just want a good queue app so I can add and move movies around.

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  20. The only reason Windows Phone 7 got an app right out of the box is because it can use the same silverlight tech already used for browser playback. It was basically just a port job so quick port job.

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  21. Silverlight. No suck there.....

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  22. Android too open for netflix "content" "partners." This news makes me respect android more, and Netflix less.

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  23. Thanks very much fort the informative update!

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  24. If netflix wont let play it on google tv google will bring up its own subscription servcie.

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  25. I appreciate the time you took to post this. I am very interested in this.

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  26. It would be a nice start if we could have an official app to manage our queues...

    Thanks,
    -Jerry

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  27. Considering how CRAPPY Netflix streaming has been lately I don't see this will be much utility. Woo hoo you can spend 3 hours watching at a static bar on your phone while intermittantly watching snatches of a 30 minute program!

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  28. I am really hoping that this isn't Corporate Politics at work. If this is delayed much longer, Netflix runs the risk of competition from other companies that aren't getting backrubs from Apple and Microsoft.

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  29. Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't google tv running and

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  30. A current Android user I owned the G1, Droid, and now the Samsung Fascinate. Android is fragmented, there are many people still using 1st and 2nd Gen of Android devices running below 2.1. Android has not even bother countering the piracy because you can google an apk and download it to your phone without having to jailbrake i.e. root. When I had my G1 I downloaded a wallpaper app from the freaking market (the MARKET) that contained malware. Good thing I had barely had any personal info stored. The OS currently sucks admit it. And I love how the stupid fanboys whine about it making us Android users look even more bad.

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  31. Was just looking for news about this. Friend was showing off his Netflix iPhone app and I was wondering about android app. Thanks for the update

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  32. Android isn't fragmented, its called choice.
    And its also called progress.
    If you have an old computer running Windows 98, you can't just expect it to be able to run Vista. Some people run Android1.6, and their devices aren't strong enough to run anything bigger. That's just progress.
    And that versions of Android look different from difference manufacturers - that's choice (something apple hates) they offer different things to different people - and normal people like that. Its only nerds who freak out.

    And finally Digital Restrictions Management is evil, so its only natural the free Android fights it.

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  33. please don't forget to build a webos 2.0 version for the new palm devices coming out in the next 2-3 months. netflix is the best service, might as well be on the best os too!!

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  34. Yes sure, if everyone who implements DRM restrictions on the Android driven devices has the same constrains as you do many few applications would have been developed for similar purposes. I think the problem is the development and the architecture of your services. If you have a platform for which your workers do not know the way into it, do not change the platform. Change the mindset.

    To everyone else, the "frustrations" brought in this text are not Android issues. It is Netflix' issues. Don't hesitate when choosing the right platform.

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  35. In mobile platforms, with freedom comes fragmentation. I love Android but there are also drawbacks. The more open and available to many devices, the more difficult to achieve consistency.

    @7bn

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  36. @Stellar Drift
    Please read the definition of fragmented before making a comment like that. Android is fragmented you idiot. "And finally Digital Restrictions Management is evil, so its only natural the free Android fights it" - Are you really that of a hippie or just plain stupid? DRM is to protect their intellectual property and they have every right to. Just recently the NFL mobile app was hacked and released to the public allowing people to watch nfl and choke the servers without paying a subscription fee. Companies need MONEY to survive and to EXPAND/BUILD better their SERVICES to other parts of the world.

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  37. Another EVO owner checking in, you-all are missing the boat on an incredible popular phone OS.

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  38. I want to contact Netflix, but do not see how to do so, so I am here. I want to know why there are not more HD instant stuff for the ROku? I have the HD ROKU but I see almost nothing in HD.

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  39. I'm going to go on a leap here and say that this is a bunch of horse puckey. If other companies can have just two guys working on Android apps to get the job done for every phone out there, Netflix with it's millions of dollars can just call Google & get the support it needs. If the guys at MediaFly with just one coder volunteering on behalf TWiT.tv can build an Android app that streams TWiT.tv content to many different Android devices both video & audio streams, Netflix has got zero excuse.

    The fragmentation argument is completely bogus. Every PC out there has at least several thousand possible configurations. Yet Netflix can every PC that can run Windows to use Netflix as long as it has Windows Media Center.

    But let's take a look at the Android "fragmentation issue" as some call it. Some are running 1.5, some running 1.6, & some run 2.0. The vast majority of handsets run Android 2.1 with a small degree running 2.2. 2.3 is almost ready. So who gets screwed? All of us 1st generation 1.5 to 2.1 handsets? That's a huge chunk of of the audience out there. This has been thoroughly discussed on TWiT. If you guys do not provide the access to content where the audience exists, you're opening the doors for pirates to come in & provide content where the industry neglects. This has been proven time and time again by Napster, the Pirate Bay, Kazaa, Limewire, & others. Instead of solving the problem, you're playing a perpetual game of whack-a-mole. The pirates have been winning that battle and will continue to do so for decades to come. You cannot beat the pirate hacker, no matter how hard you try.

    If Netflix screws over the first generation Android adopters, you're leaving the door wide open for someone else to provide, & your industry partners will not get one single dollar for their content. My advice to avoid this Pandora's box? Get cracking on a stellar Netflix apps that supports EVERY Android 2.1/2.2/2.3 device out there. This would mitigate most of that scenario. Don't pick and choose because Android users are probably the geekiest of the crowd. They will find away to work around the false restrictions that DRM casts. Netflix folks really need to watch & read more technology podcast and enlighten themselves to the realities how easy it is to pirate.

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  40. I've read through this post a few times and am having some difficulty understanding both the original problem and the solution that Greg is suggesting.

    From what I can gather, it seems that Netflix's product development team is frustrated to find that there is no integrated support for DRM'd media streams provided by the OS. From here, he jumps to the conclusion that the best approach is working with individual handset manufacturers to patch in support for this at the OS or kernel level. This is difficult to understand.

    It's an operating system. You build things on top of it. One does not go to every PC manufacturer to add a "feature" to one.

    Spectres of "fragmentation" aside, let's remember that these phones are real computers running a real Linux-based OS that run real software, written in real programming languages like C, Java, and Scala. They also have support for encrypted transports like SSL and high-quality video codecs like H.264. Heck, Adobe's even done it - secure content streaming on Android is possible, and works fine (speaking strictly of the transport and decoding layer - leave it to the bloggeurs to hash over the platform itself).

    As a software developer for many years, these facts suggest that implementing secure DRM'd video streams and a player for them is not only possible, but much easier than working directly with two of the most backward-facing industries in technology now (film studios and mobile phone providers) to add this functionality.

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  41. It would be extremely helpful to have some idea of which phones will be in the opening platform - I'm probably going to replace my Droid 1 soon (likely with a Droid X), and knowing what phones will support netflix out of the gate would absolutely be a primary factor in my decision.

    Thanks (x1000) for getting Android up & running!

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  42. Have you looked at DashO from PreEmptive Solutions? It does everything that Dotfuscator for .NET does (they are both from the same company). This includes obfuscation AND analytics AND exception reporting.

    http://www.preemptive.com/know-more/mobile

    While ProGuard (the obfuscator recommended by Google) is fine for what it does - it does not offer control flow, string encryption, or any kind of analytics or exception reporting.

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  43. I don't understand the piracy issue.

    1. Netflix has videos of many new releases much after the blu ray. Pirates had their copy of those videos much before the video releases on blu-ray.

    2. Netflix subscribers already pay monthly. Why would they want to pirate. Or is it because someone can restream? Then I suppose that is a valid reason.

    It sucks. I have an android phone. I would love to have Netflix during my commute.

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  44. if (Android == Linux && DRM == Microsoft)
    {
    androidStream = false;
    }


    But I don't care about this. Please bring back the Community Features you axed on Labour Day. And Stop Wasting Engineering Time to get streaming on Cell Phones!

    People like to watch movies on Cell phones (small screens) now?

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  45. Two words:

    MICROSOFT SILVERLIGHT

    Thanks for the attempt at a PR spin, but it's not enough for those of us who know better...

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  46. My cell provider is saying they have no intention of upgrading the OS to Froyo for some freaky reason, now I find out that Netflix will only run on certain cell phones?

    What the fuck is going on with Android?!

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  47. To everyone whining about security here. You are completely missing the point!

    The fact is the security capabilities and to a larger extent the general capabilities and specifications of the Android devices differ so wildly and are in such a large quantity that it is difficult to come up with a "one-fits-all" solution.

    This is something we are hearing time and time again from Android developers. The platform may sell a ton of devices, but the experience for both developers and consumers is currently appalling.

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  48. I don't understand why so many of us deny the fragmentation problem. It's been painfully obvious for a while now that Android is fragmented. I own an Android phone but I don't think that requires me to deny the fragmentation problem. If we don't, as users, start expecting better from Google and their partners, this will continue to get worse. So, let's acknowledge that it's a real problem and use that to push for better. If we can't do that, I might as well go buy an iPhone and save myself the hassle and frustration.

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  49. "My cell provider is saying they have no intention of upgrading the OS to Froyo "

    Join the club man. It seems in the Android world, once they have your money, your only upgrade path is buying a whole new phone. I have a phone that is less than 6 months old and it's already been verified that it's not ever going to be updated from 2.1. So, I've cooled on the Android hype as a result of that and I'm probably going with Win Phone 7 or Apple next time around. Say what you will about proprietary systems but at least those users get full updates and support for several years.

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  50. It's really incredible the number of posters who have little or no reading comprehension at all. I mean, you DID read the article before posting, didn't you?

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  51. Don't know where to request a film be added to NetFlix?

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  52. I can appreciate Netflix's point.

    The lack of digital rights management on Android is a serious limitation. It allows apps to be hacked and content to be taken for free. Just ask the NFL about how it's app was hacked so people can watch games without paying.

    Motorola, unlike other manufacturers, heavily encrypts Android to print hacking the system. You can't even delete the bult in apps on Droid. Thus I believe Motorola's Android phones will be a natural for getting Netflix.

    Android is fragmented. The OS is modified by every manufacturer. This is why it is hard to update every phone, unlike iPhone or Windos Phone 7.

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  53. Eu vou quebra o teu pescoço, vou arrancar tua cabeça.

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  54. I want netflix on my Ubuntu too. It is a regular PC, there are lots of Linux (and a lot of those are Ubuntu) users. Figure it out. You are in a position, the the premier video streaming service to negotiate with the studios. I could live with DRM if it worked on my system. If you can't figure it out, I'd still like to pay you to watch the streaming service without DRM. Otherwise I find other ways to watch the videos and the studios get nothing.

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  55. Finally! I hope current top-phones are supported: EVO, Galaxy S, Droid-X, and similar devices.

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  56. look at the list of andrid phones:
    http://www.androphones.com/2010-android-phones.php

    only 35 percent of which are running the most current OS.

    since google leaves updates to the carriers/manufacturers discretion, you have HUGELY fragmented ecosystem.

    how can netflix deploy to EVERY device at the same time with so many variables

    Apple on the other hand has 4 phone models and 4 versions of the OS.. same for Win7 - one OS.

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  57. What about an app just for managing my queue and rating movies? I don't want to watch movies on my phone, but using the website from my phone is impossible.

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  58. So, the lack of DRM support on Android prohibits Netflix from producing a simple queue manager app?

    Right now, Netflix has NO presence on Android which is pretty laughable.

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  59. Maybe you can also throw some of that effort on getting streaming on...Linux. I've been a Netflix customer since 1999 and have been waiting on streaming for Linux since, well, Netflix started doing streaming.

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  60. yeah thanks for the update... which phones?

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  61. yeah thanks for the update.... oh wait a minute... you left something out... which phones?

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  62. While I appreciate the update, the reason's given make no technical sense to me.

    Only a DRM setup specific to the Netflix app could be secure in the long run. Since Android is open source, anyone with an understanding of the system knows where to look. Also, limiting your encryption and access to the app allows you to replace and update compromised security quickly by making your access reliant on the new version. Operators/carriers don't update their firmware fast enough to be secure.

    Netflix, YOU need to take charge of the DRM security so you can convince your content providers not to fear the platform. Android can handle it. Its time to go buy a company that has specialized in data security and show the "content providers that "open source" does not mean unsecured.

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  63. OK let's start the comment this way... I am a Netflix subscriber that purchased an EVO because Netflix said there was going to be an app for the EVO... SO is the EVO one of the very special phones that will be blessed with the Netflix app?

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  64. So we wait, wait, and continue to wait, all in the name of providing this content in a "secure" way to the consumer.

    No more than a day after the app is released to "certain devices", it will be hacked to work on any Android phone. Just cut out the BS and deliver it directly to your paying customers!

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  65. I think it was made pretty clear. There is no standard content protection mechanism on Android. For content protection to work, it requires a cooperation. Panasonic COULD make a DVD player that would play every DVD in every region, but they'd get sued by the MPAA and would never make another DVD player.

    With Android being open, there is NOTHING to stop someone from creating a version that does everything it can to circumvent any DRM Netflix applies.

    It's not about fragmentation. It is the old open and closed argument. My guess is Netflix is coming to the more closed Android phones first where manufactures can guarantee the most security.

    I'd be really surprised if we see it on something like the Nexus One, because something that open is probably what the MPAA is scared of.

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  66. I think the point made early on in the comments really makes sense. Are there really concerns that someone wants to use an android stream from Netflix for pirating material? There are much better quality sources and they are used everyday to pirate movies throughout the world. I see the point in that they probably have legal agreements in place to satisfy the movie studios who own most of the content on Netflix so they can't implement an application without some kind of DRM but it's pretty ridiculous that they will not be able to roll out one app to most devices strictly through the market. So glad I went back to iPhone after dabbling with android early this year.

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  67. Personally, I'd like to see them up the quality control of the streaming content before they put more effort into streaming to cell phones. I mean, 9 out of 10 new streaming shows are all messed up, missing audio, episodes out of order, certain shows not streaming smoothly, etc. Put some dev time into those issue before you PR spin crap about cell phones.

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  68. This is great news; I am glad to here you are working towards it. Thank you!

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  69. Seems to me that Big Content is encouraging the Apple/Microsoft model of content delivery over any other form.

    Unless you own a popular Android device (Droid, Nexus One, Evo, MyTouch) forget about any real apps. I can imagine this becoming an upsell point in phone stores... (Yeah it has Android, but would you know it, Google decided to shut off Market on all versions of Android lower than 3.0 in 2011. This is the "budget" model, the real Android phone is over here...)

    So, the question... does Google's OEM Manufacturers keep producing devices that are sub-1.0GHz to make a low price point that no app development will take place, or does Google start inheriting some of Microsoft's past edicts and start dictating to manufacturers what their next devices use in terms of baseline hardware?

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  70. which phones are on your OK Android list?

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  71. While Netflix streaming on Android in interesting I'd really like to see being able to manage my Netflix queue and view movie info on my Android phone even if I can't actually watch movies on the phone.

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  72. Instead of working with the "Android community, handset manufacturers, carriers, and other service providers" wouldn't it make much more sense to work with Google to get the necessary APIs and frameworks into the OS itself so it works on any Android phone regardless of carrier?

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  73. These "major studios" do know that I can go to the library and borrow a DVD of their hot new movie for free, and perfectly legally, right?

    I thought I understood DRM in theory, but I'm puzzled as to the specific purpose of DRM for movies is, since it's obviously not to prevent me from watching these movies for free.

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  74. Or maybe you work harder to actually serve your customers and stop entering into license agreements that prevent you from streaming on Linux or DRM-"problematic" Android. It's incredibly rich to see this blog post about how excited you are to get on new devices, but no Linux? Nice spin, but this post is FOS Netflix.

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  75. Getting netflix on more devices is all well and good but I think that you guys need to focus more on improving the core service, namely more content! In the US its not bad but here in Canada we get so little its sad.

    Dont get me wrong, power to you guys who want to get this on android or other cellphones although I dont understand why youd want to watch a movie on a cell phone in full Squinto Vision but really netflix you need to focus more on getting content, improving service and streaming, and for crying out loud will you get something resembling customer service??

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  76. It's raelly obvious that Google's tactic here is to force you to buy a whole new phone thus making more money off you for something as simple as an update. Wow, don't be evil, my butt.

    --Andrew Ross

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  77. "Or maybe you work harder to actually serve your customers and stop entering into license agreements that prevent you from streaming on Linux or DRM-"problematic" Android"

    Awww... poor baby. Really sucks when your hippie everything-should-be-free ethos comes back to bite you Android users in the ass, huh? Reality check for you and the rest of the Googoo-heads out there: it costs money to make movies. Duh. And it's just delightful to see the temper tantrums from the never-pay-for-content crowd who so often believe themselves to be superior to everyone else.

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  78. I signed up for Netflix just today because of this blog post .. I have EVO and I sure hope that it will be one of the android devices that can stream content from Netflix. If not, I will be cancelling my plan faster than you can say "netflix sucks".

    Thanks,
    Osho

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  79. Douglas wrote:
    The Android Netflix Player has been delayed because there is too much freedom on that platform?

    Interesting...


    Is not about freedom, it is about fragmented reality. Android IS fragmented, both on hardware and software. Period.

    nickolas

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  80. Seriously why would you sign-up or cancel your subscription based on it working on your cell? Trying to watch movies on your cellphone is pointless and plain silly, if your gonna pay for netflix then watch the movies on your TV, or atleast on your PC where you can actually see whats happening.

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  81. ironically, samsung seems to have implemented a DRM service on its galaxy devices. it even has its own media hub, to buy and rent movies and tv shows. honestly, netflix isnt even trying.

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  82. This is quite possibly the worst excuse I've ever heard from Netflix. Even worse that the BS about not having subtitles on Instant.

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  83. So, uh, Netflix... want to just say "No Player For Android" just yet? If not, more vitriol and spite is coming your way.

    IF those are the real reasons, you may as well not make a player at all. It's only a matter of time before some slagoff who uses a non-approved device writes a Market app that intercepts playing movies and saves them as a huge MP4 file for editing and redistribution later. It's only a matter of time.

    It will happen, and when it does, you're going to need a kill switch for that app. Why even bother writing it at all?

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  84. Just three days ago I took my Droid X back and bought an iPhone 4, and I'm not looking back. Fragmentation is only going to be a bigger and bigger problem for Android, and neither Google nor any of their partners seem to have a plan to alleviate it. I'm out. - Steve Andrews

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  85. When will andriod users realize that they got duped. Android has become a meta platform that the handset makers and carries are using to create their own locked down versions of the operating system. There is no consistency, the "open" android is truly nothing by a smoke screen. It's not a matter of getting "better" android developers. It's a matter of having to different versions on the application for each class of handset. This becomes prohibitively expensive very fast, very quickly.

    Windows Phone 7 is a SINGLE platform that Microsoft will rule with an iron fist. Just like the iPhone. One app developed on WP7 will run on all WP7 devices. One app developed on iOS will run on all iOS devices. The only thing open about android is the carriers can now mold is to do anything they want. Verizon is taking this to a whole new level with it's junk apps and forced updates to add things you don't want. You've been fooled, deceived, hoodwinked, bamboozled, and lied to by Google, Version, and every supporter of Android.

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  86. Make an Android app for the the tablets. Ie: Galaxy tab and others that are coming out. Then go to the larger screen phones: Evo, Galaxy S, etc.
    I love the iphone app, I use it alot. Luckily, I have unlimited data! But I would like to buy a Galaxy Tab and watch netflix on it.

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  87. Whatever...bring back the friends feature and all will be forgiven.

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  88. It's just amazing how so many people that know so little about security, DRM, and the various versions of Android out in the wild will post completely uninformed comments. I get that you are pissed, but stick to what you know. Like my phone is so shiny and cute.

    Silly people, netflix wants your money and your contracts. They don't want to piss off the content providers cause if they lose them, they are big trouble.

    So be cool, stick to what you know something about. Let's not pretend that ever person who has read a flame about android, iphone, or win 7 is suddenly a security expert qualified to compare the security of all these platforms.

    If you want some changes, maybe you should send Google a note, or if you're really so #%@# off, then vote with your wallets and leave Netflix. Yeah - didn't think so.

    Just one persons 2 cents.

    Let the flaming replies from the uninformed masses begin.

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  89. Would love a webOS version and hopefully thinking in Palms direction. Sorli...

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  90. Hi Greg:

    My company built, and currently manages the mobile movie service app on Android for one of Netflix's competitors.

    We are experts in the field of DRM and video content and we have already installed your competition's application on all of the major OEM's across all U.S. carriers. (Forgive me for not being more specific, but I don't want to give too much away on your blog.) My company also runs AT&T's video service and Verizon's V-Cast as well, and I run our North American OEM group.

    I know that you've speaking with the major OEM's about this Android application and they in turn reached out to us about providing an application for Netflix.

    I would love to chance to speak to you directly about how we managed the DRM and implementation for the premium video within the application, as well as how we might be able to assist you in these matters.

    If this interests you, please contact me at mlinhardt74@gmail.com for more information and details.

    Thanks!
    Mike

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  91. Still waiting on an official announcement of VASTLY expanded content selection in Canada. Until then, you don't get my money. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  92. I read about half of these comments (too many) so sorry if someone brought this up... But does anyone realize Google TV runs on Android? Sure, a variation of it, but it's still ANDROID and Google TV HAS Netflix streaming. So to me, this is fishy.

    And everyone complaining about a Que app, search the market or google search it. There are a few que managing apps already out there. Phone Flix (check spelling) I believe is one of the better ones, but I haven't tried it - I'm just looking for the streaming.

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  93. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  94. I think I see what's going on. Back in 2008 Microsoft had an exclusive deal with Netflix for there Xbox

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25680004/ns/technology_and_science-games


    Interesting enough, Netflix was available for Xbox, but not for Sony and Nintendo. Strangely though Netflix would ship out a DVD to play Netflix. Now 2010, Nintendo and Sony just received online netflix capabilities without a DVD, these both happened about the same time.

    Now I'm reading this,

    http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2010/may10/05-25playreadynetflixpr.mspx

    I imagine Netflix fully supported on the Android phones and other non-Microsoft devices in 2 years.

    Lame

    ReplyDelete
  95. Wow, it looks as if all the "Android is open/good--Apple is closed/bad" zealots chose the wrong platform. Too bad. The good news is, you can still come on over to Apple's iphone and iOS. We won't hold your bad choices against you, and even though we are over 100 million members strong, there is plenty of room in our tent for you too. Come experience what great software and hardware with awesome hw/sw integration feels like.

    p.s. Apple will have zero fragmentation as of next week....all iOS devices (iphones, ipod touches, iPads) will be on one version of the iOS, iOS 4.2.

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  96. Brasil, filho da puta.

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  97. Bummed:( false security in DRM put aside, it shouldn't be too tough to create a software only solution. The presence of DRM, not the strength is what the DMCA calls for. HDMI, DVD... what DRM hasn't been circumvented? Yet you succomb to the sad excuse not to offer a fantastic marketing piece (stream to android) due to this?

    Thanks for the transparency... but do kick back to MPAA that iPhone DRM is already hacked...

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  98. The "lack of a generic and complete platform security and content protection mechanism" didn't seem to stop Amazon releasing Kindle for Android. In fact your assertion is blatantly false, as Android most certainly does support DRM, using the DRM Protected Content Storage service present on every Android handset.

    I think the delay has more to do with Netflix having to negotiate licensing deals with multiple vendors, since the Free Software nature of Android means Google can't/won't distribute your proprietary software to those vendors, rather than anything to do with a fictitious lack of standards.

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  99. Douglas Ward: Too much piracy more like it. Android is like the wild west - take a few moments and look at the apps - a great number of them freely snoop your personal data - so sure, I get why Netflix would be nervous about android. Any developer gets this.

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  100. Hey, Greg! Glad to hear us Android users aren't being left out here. However, I am still be excluded in another, quite similar area. When will we have the ability to stream instantly on Linux proper? Which I suppose also ties into the question of whether you are still considering switching to HTML5, or if any platform changes at all are coming. I don't think I can express quite how annoying it is to have to boot to Windows just to watch a movie...an annoyance caused by Netflix (and also M$)...

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  101. was wondering if a movie queue for streaming is going to be implemented anytime soon, that would be really helpful. I can actually help the company with the implementation if needed :D

    Love Netflix.

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  102. "Setting aside the debate around the value of content protection and DRM, they are requirements we must fulfill in order to obtain content from major studios for our subscribers to enjoy. Although we don’t have a common platform security mechanism and DRM, we are able to work with individual handset manufacturers to add content protection to their devices."

    If you are being sold a "Digital Restrictions Management" system that is supposed to keep your users from copying the 'content', you are being sold a bill of goods. If the studios require you to enter into such foolish contracts, they are playing a game of chicken against the advancement of technology.

    I am saddened to see so many commenters lamenting the lack of DRM support: it is not a feature any rational consumers would want or ask for.

    Note to the people using DVD as a model: the patents used to force the region-coding restrictions should be expiring soon. If a manufacturer is willing to stop using the trademarked "DVD" logo, they can make a generic digital video player. Why do you think Blu-ray with stereoscopic playback is being pushed so hard?

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  103. You mean to tell me that Blockbuster and Hulu can do this, but Netflix can't?

    I smell BS...

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  104. thank you admin

    www.bestoffrm.com

    ReplyDelete
  105. Any date on Netflix for my Sony XBR TV?

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  106. If you don't allow blanket deployment on Android, I'll take my business elsewhere. Stop the PR bullshit and deploy it, now. Don't give me DRM excuses either. Only the paranoid and weak hide behind DRM.

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  107. Oh, and to people who say "Well Netflix doesn't want to make content providers mad!": The customers are whom they should be focusing on, NOT the money hungry providers.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Have you considered looking at an Adobe Flash solution? That way it would be available on a number of devices on your site, and it provides industry standard (and exceeding) DRM options.

    Just some food for thought.

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  109. Please, please, please include the LG Ally!!! Please!!

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  110. Southparkstudios.com streams perfectly to my phone in the browser even!

    I agree with people on here saying that this smells like BS.

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  111. Two words: Adobe Flash. It's already on a variety of different Android devices, and provides the common playing field you are looking for on this platform (and other platforms too, but that's another conversation). With respect to DRM and streaming functionality, you'd be pressed to find better support on any platform than what Flash already offers. I hope you're not overlooking this rather obvious option because of some stupid religious position on the Flash vs HTML5 debate. Use the right tool for the job dammit!

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  112. Just for clarity sakes, the minute you put a netflix.apk out it will be ported to the whole community, so lets not waste to much time.

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  113. REPUBLICA FEDERATIVA DO BRASIL
    MINISTÉRIO DO TRABALHO
    Secretaria de Políticas de Emprego e Salário

    CARTEIRA DE TRABALHO
    E
    PREVIDÊNCIA SOCIAL
    10579596

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  114. what you really mean to say is that Apple & Windows have given Netflix such an insane amount of money to avoid Droid that you now have to wait until that huge payout contract wears off.

    It makes sense because Droid is the cheap phone & it is always better to cater to the rich before you cater to those that keep your company solvent.

    Amazon has no DRM issues...
    Pandora has no DRM issues...

    Just admit that you do not care about the consumer & that you are really just out for the $$$$ like all the other capitalist pigs...

    ReplyDelete
  115. Can we get an instant queue in Canada now please?

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  116. This is BS. You need to tell the "major studios" to &(43*@ off. Instead of complying with the demands of these studios YOU need to stop putting up with it. DRM doesn't work. It never has. We don't have DRM with music any more why do we need it with video? We already showed what a failure it was. I'm not accepting this as an answer. If anybody else wants to follow me there is plenty of good content on youtube & hulu. And for libre (free, as in freedom) computers in the US check out www.thinkpenguin.com and www.open-pc.com in Europe. Stop letting these companies screw around with your rights. For music http://one.ubuntu.com/

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  117. Brasil, terra de merda fedorenta.

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  118. Greg Peters, screw off, troll!

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  119. Truly a pity that netflix dumped all the social networking features that made the site so useful. I can no longer tell if a reviewer has similar taste to me . . . this makes the reviews basically worthless.

    A pity you've degraded the service so badly. Shame.

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  120. This makes plenty of sense to me. For an iphone port I need to support 2 basic architectures and a few versions of the relatively solid os (with mature api's). Now for android I need to support 20 or so specific handsets with multiple OS's as well. All those OS's have specific speed processors, memory, screen size etc. For apple I have an iphone 4 or an iphone 3gs and that is it. So many winers. This is what "open" freedom is ... the power of chaos does not allow easy integration, every job is custom. As said in the article if they can't get DRM right on all those platform combinations the studios will not let them have content.

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  121. Don't forget about the Droid 1! There are still many users of that device in the world.

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  122. I don't get this. Why not just release the app on the high end Droids, like the Droid X, Droid 2 Global, Samsung Galaxy S devices? I mean, Blockbuster, which has usually been a step behind you guys, already beat you to the punch. They come pre-installed on the Droids, and you can rent or download movies from them w/ little hassle. This all sounds like an excuse for being caught with your pants down.

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  123. this is bullshit and you know it. if people wanted to save a Netflix stream, they will.

    can you identify ONE DRM technology that hasn't been cracked yet? I certainly can't.

    point being, the reason many people don't pirate Netflix is because it's cheap and good enough that we don't have to.

    so climb out of the DMCA's ass and continue being the cool, innovative company that you started out as.

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  124. It seems to me that you would be better off to put your investment into getting a DRM solution either into the OS or build your own into your Netflix App for Android. If I buy an android phone and then find out in the future that I don't have the right phone to get Netflix I will be a very unhappy customer.

    It is unlikely I will be willing to change phones to get Netflix and as such I will probably no longer be a Netflix customer.

    Please put your investment where it counts the most for your customers and work for towards an App that works regardless of phone model/manufacturer/carrier.

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  125. I love the conspiricy theories, they are so entertaining.

    It doesn't matter how many othere examples of similar services you can name that are already on android.

    Netflix must meet its obligations that it has negociated. RTFA.

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  126. Netflix mobile by groovu is saying they can make it happen and just put the app on the market.

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  127. I just downloaded the Rhapsody app for android and it now allows you to load files on your phone for off network listening. Call the folks at Rhapsody and see how they are addressing the problem. Don't let Blockbuster beat you to the punch!!!

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  128. This doesn't have to do with Android but merely a suggestion. With Netflix streaming I have shut off my cable. BUT, any way Netflix can add a HBO or SHOWTIME package? I would be more willing to pay for it without the hefty cable bill.

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  129. I love Netflix and all, but you guys clearly don't have your act together. This will be my last month with your service.

    I chose you guys because you were an affordable, appealing, ethical alternative to ThePirateBay.org.
    If you guys get things up and running, I may come back. But as it stands, you guys are a dying company with more concern for avarice than customer satisfaction.

    Who cares if what you do may piss off studio execs? They're not going to pull their content from your servers. They just aren't. They're hemorrhaging $$ as it is, because of internet piracy. Taking a stand here will finally beat some sense into them, THEY DON'T NEED TO MAKE TENS OR HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS BEFORE IT'S OKAY FOR SOMEONE TO WATCH THEIR CONTENT.

    It was great while it lasted, but the time has come to reopen BitTorrent. Peace. I'm out.

    -Anon

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  130. since youve long ignored morse code and telegraph users for your app service i will cancel my account and continue to make anonymous comments bitching about it.

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  131. 1) Why can't we send Netflix an email comment (especially about website issues).

    2) On the web site, when I go to New Arrivals under Watch Instantly, I often get an error message.

    3) Same place, the new arrivals screens usually don't filter out shows I've already rated. So, it's tough to find actual new arrivals that I'd be interested in.

    4) Even though I check for Watch Instantly new arrivals daily, when I look under specific genres I find Watch Instantly new arrivals that I never saw under the New Arrivals area. Heck, sometimes I find them in the Browse DVD section and not even under Watch Instantly.

    5) On Roku, the Netflix suggested shows ignore my ratings. Specifically, it shows me shows I've marked as Not Interested or even shows I've marked as Don't Like. Roku claims these suggestions come from Netflix and not from them.

    6) And, did I mention that it would be nice to send email to you guys about these kinds of problems?

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  132. Ok gotta say at this point i don't think any Canadians care about what cell phone they can watch on (which yes i would use) because the lack of movies is a HUGE HUGE HUGE issue.

    Seriously Netflix kicks your butt in availability- if only they had free streaming.

    NO problems cancelling my account before my next billing as the movie selection SUCKS> We search find a movie OH wait "not available"

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  133. id like for people to not be able to review movies that are in post production/not even made.

    dumbest thing ever.

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  134. From what I've read, the Netflix app will only work on Android 2.3, which means my 2 month old droid Incredible is out of luck?

    Not cool. I'm going to switch to Blockbuster.

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  135. When i purchased my droid X over the droid Incredible, i was told that it would stream Netflix, we'll see if that was a blatent lie on the sailsmans part or not in 2011...false advertising i tell ya

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  136. As a home schooling mother, I would like to see more educational material. Movies on counting, addition and subtraction, reading, ect, would be a real asset to home schoolers. The documentaries are spectacular. Just a suggestion.

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  137. I would like to know then why my Droid X came preinstalled with an app from Blockbuster that does streaming?

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  138. Thank you for the update. One more vote for the EVO.

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  139. Sony released a streaming app for android, Crackle. Available content is, let's just say, undesirable; but they don't seem to have any issues with DRM. Also, the comments from steve seem to add up to new phones having netflix installed/preloaded. I'm not seeing any desire to develop apps for existing "smartphones". Maybe I'm reading too much between the lines.

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  140. I responded to a "free 30 day offer" and now you're only giving me a 14-day free offer.

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  141. How is DRM an issue if you are streaming the video and not allowing it to fully download to the device?? Maybe I am just over-simplifying this, but it doesn't make much sense to me!!

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  142. Maybe I'm crazy, but I think this is AWESOME news. If the major content producers are so set on DRM and locking out their customers from viewing their content (something we Linux users have had to live with for a long time) targeting the fastest growing mobile platform is one way to gain a lot of "fans" :)

    If there's a faster way to kill DRM in the hearts and minds of consumers I'm not sure what it might be. Go Hollywood!!!

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  143. Anonymous,
    November 17, 2010 6:16 PM:

    If you can see it you can copy it. That is how the universe works. To defeat that, you would have to defeat the generally-accepted principle of cause and effect.

    Another issue: if you are only allowed to download a small piece at a time, you are limited by the speed of your network connection.

    Video needs to be sent "in the clear" and the end-users need to respect copyright law. I don't see either happening in the near term due to outrageous copyright reforms.

    ReplyDelete
  144. Piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

    ReplyDelete
  145. Piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

    ReplyDelete
  146. Off subject but i'm having trouble getting hold of an email address to contact anyone on Netflix - i'm on Hawaii time and so far over the last couple of weeks my nightly netflix viewing has coincided with "scheduled maintenance" around half a dozen times. Once fine, maybe twice, but seriously, especially when the first I hear about this scheduled maintenance is when I try and watch a movie! I can see the contact phone number, but would like an email address to write question to, once i'm already tucked up and ready for a movie before bed is the last point in time I want to make a phone call and I work long hours so forget in the day....

    Any help?

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  147. Eu vou te dar, uma bomba.

    ReplyDelete
  148. OK, so how is Blockbuster doing it then? Their app came standard on my Droid X and I can't even uninstall it.

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  149. Not sure if this questioned has been asked somewhere else, but why does every R rated movie have the same rating restriction of:

    Pervasive strong language, some sexuality and brief drug use

    It's weird.

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  150. Its great to see Netflix extending support further for Watch Now.

    As one of many Netflix customers who use Linux on my PC, I've been very disappointed at Netflix's ongoing failure to recognize us and support "watch Now" on Linux PCs.

    Even though I presumably pay for Watch Now service as a part of my Netflix montly fee, I've never been able to actually use it.

    I know that Roku both supports streaming from Netflix and is actually using Linux internally, and that Android is just a variant of Linux too. So Linux-based Netflix players already exist.
    Releasing it for Linux PCs is just a marketing decision that could happen immediately if Netflix wanted to please all its customers.

    Is there any hope at all of Netflix finally acknowledging Linux-based PCs and Linux Home Media Servers exist and that many customers have them, or should I just accept that Netflix just won't ever care about this group of its customers and close my Netflix account now?

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  151. MYTouch 4G Please!!!

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  152. if netflix wont play on google tv then google should start its own movie rental on the gogle tv.

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  153. Netflix Canada sucks. There is no selection. EVERYTHING I searched is not available. But I guess that's Canada's communistic censorship shining though once again.

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  154. Although this news is kindof exciting, it mostly sucks.

    I'm not super familiar with Android, but I do develop software for a living, and I can't imagine that an open-source platform like Android wouldn't have adequate DRM tools to satisfy the major studios whose movies might be viewed on an Android device.

    I'm really, really getting sick of this exclusive bullcrap that seems to be going into every new electronic device these days. The iPhone is exclusive to AT&T. Swype is exclusive to certain devices.

    Netflix please don't do this.

    I'd rather see you release an app in the market that worked on ALL Android devices, with a limited list of movies (maybe only certain producers?), rather than a full-featured app that only works on certain handsets. Then, work out the kinks with DRM as time goes on.

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  155. Totally unrelated comment, but I cannot figure out how to ask basic questions on the website. I just want to know if Netflix Canada is going to start offering a better selection of movies and maybe some new releases? I think it would go a long way in keeping long-term customers of the site. I hope that plans are in the works for this.

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  156. Again, because there's no way to contact Netflix with website problems, I'm sticking this here:

    What have you done to your website!!! This morning, I took a look and now I'm smashed in the face with a big blurb about rating movies. Well, I HAVE rated them. That's why every single Watch Instantly show has been rated. And, it used to be that because I had rated them all, the main page only showed me new Watch Instantly shows. Now, I've got four pages of movies that I've already rated staring me in the face: shows I've rated positively, shows I've rated as Not Interested, and even shows I've rated negatively (i.e., "Didn't Like It" or "Hated It"). Why? If I've told Netflix I'm not interested in something or told them I didn't like something, who thought it would be a good idea to push the stuff back at me as a suggestion? Why are you making it so hard to find new things to watch and irritate your subscribers?

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  157. Another frustrated Linux user here. Your continued reticence regarding giving your Linux customers even the *option* of not paying for services you refuse to provide them finally made me an ex-customer.

    You'll perhaps note that Hulu works just fine on Linux. (http://www.hulu.com/plus#devices) Guess where my money's going now?

    ReplyDelete
  158. HTC EVO better be the first device since it's 4G and has a big enough screen to truly enjoy netflix streams.

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  159. I feel so left out :( all of my iphone friends can watch netflix. I can't. this is probably going to be like skype for android. only avaliable on verizon phones. >:(

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  160. Thank you for the update. It is very much appreciated. Hopefully you will be able to tell us which devices are planned for the initial launch of Android access to Netflix, as this may influence the next device I purchase.

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  161. Just curios what do the studios have to say about I-phones that have been jail broken? Seriously If someone is going to steal something DRM is not going to stop them, it just makes it harder for the consumer to enjoy movies/tv on the go. The bottom line is show me the money.

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  162. Tiraram, a vagina.

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  163. Thank god something is finally happening I was starting to get upset that all my apple ifolks had access to it and I didnt. Either way I still love my DROID over the iphone..... I look forward to the release.

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  164. So many excuses from Netflix. Thats all they are, Roku is Linux, PS3 is basically Linux, so really, whats the real reason. And Windows Phone first! I hope they realize the Windows phone will fail again like all their past attempts in the phone market, and Android is the #2 selling phone quickly creaping up on Blackberry for tje #1spot, so why is it last? About friggin time is all I can say.

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  165. How about more streaming devices for TV's?? like Boxee Box

    A queue for Canada would be most welcome.

    ReplyDelete
  166. O Brasil, está com medo de leste a oeste.
    24 horas

    ReplyDelete
  167. +1 Vote For Bringing NetFlix to the Evo!

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  168. hopefully you can solve the android and linux DRM issue at the same time! Getting Netflix working on android and ubuntu is very important to me!

    ReplyDelete
  169. Not Android related, but, you told me a particular DVD had a "long wait". I got it immediately from Redbox at Wallmart. I then got an email saying the DVD was shipped (which it was) and I received it today. The "long wait" was basically your normal turn-around time. Please be more accurate so I don't have to patronize Redbox and the inconvenience of a trip to Wallmart. Thanks

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  170. Just got an android...too bad you charged me for my "free" month. Just canceled my account.

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  171. I can't wait for the day it can stream on my Android (if my device is lucky). Netflix should be everywhere-It is a hallmark of our time!

    ReplyDelete
  172. Tiraram, a vagina.

    ReplyDelete
  173. Canada, as barrancas de terra caidas, faz barrento o nosso rio mar.

    ReplyDelete
  174. Bheno Bhram
    Raul Pompeia

    ReplyDelete
  175. I have a few issues with netflix's excuse regarding the android app as well. Netflix sounds like they have access to Apple's bank account. The same way that the NFL does with DirectTV. Exclusive deals can, I imagine can be quite profitable for a company like Netflix to remain loyal to apple. Did Apple threaten to cancel thier accounts with you if you took away thier exclusive rights and offered your service to android as well? I know you could say we have the app on Microsoft Windows Series 7. But we know you cannot deny Microsoft the app after all there are more windows computers then there are Macs. And you didnt want microsoft to block your streaming on their OS. And it has nothing to do with Widows having Silverlight as someone suggested. As far as I know Apple doesnt have Silverlight. So did you had to appease Apple? So you focused on thier Ipad. And since you have no ties with Google you probablly told Apple you wont make the app for them. But now the droid has outsold IPhone and you are being pressured by your end users to develope an app for their droid phones. But Apple is saying no. So you came up with the security excuse. So you probably told Apple you will just make it for select android devices. I have read several articles where Apple has said Netflix blasted android for their platform and its security. I even read where Apple claimed the android app was put on hold.
    You may say this is absurd, and it may well be. But it makes more sense than your excuse.
    You have an awesome service. And you already have the contracts, the systems and the customer base, Apple sees the app is a valuable service, however does not have the resources to under take streaming of thier own content, hence they need you. Microsoft, does not need Netflix as much as netflix needs Microsoft. Microsoft could have began thier own media streaming, and they would have sold it to every platform. Apple is losing in the smart phone industry and so they are focusing on the IPad. Dont be surprised if they abandon the IPhone like they did with the Mac. Then where will Netflix be? This is just my own observation, and how I see it. I would want to move in the direction of my end users rather than going down with a company known for dropping their product and their customers. Remember what they did to their user groups. They abandoned them without notice.

    ReplyDelete
  176. Iê iê ôêô êô
    Ô ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ô ê ô
    Boi garantido chegou
    Ô ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ê ô
    Boi garantido chegou
    Ô ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ê ô iêiêiêiêiêiê ô ô ô ê ô
    Boi garantido chegou

    ReplyDelete
  177. How about you make a working iPod app first....

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  178. take apart a current android app and cut and paste the security code that your monkeys can't figure out, and use it on the viewer. I love netflix... but tired of the games. as soon as a movie streaming company comes out with a platform app... I AM GONE! the iphone and windows based phones are trash.... catch up netflix... or miss out... this is how most android phone users feel.

    ReplyDelete
  179. Nice post to hang on. I really loved it the way of the stuff provided in this article.
    Mobile Marketing
    New York

    ReplyDelete
  180. You're really going to make this excuse under the guise of "security concerns"?

    DO you people even surf the internet? There's already hacks to dump your video out to disk on xbox, pc, and wii. I'm sure there's probably one for iphone due any moment. You also mail dvd's, which can be easily ripped. You can't seriously expect us to believe that the reason for you stonewalling on android is "it's not secure"

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  181. Do it like Sprint does its 4G service, send the user a RSA encryption key that the app uses to unencrypt the stream. Then only allow that key to be used by one person at a time. If the user gives out his/her RSA key they'll be sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  182. This sucks. Why do I have to pay for something I do not, and if some cases, cannot watch. I have a Mac and am unable to stream movies instantly because I do not have Intel. I also have a DVR so why would I watch TV on my computer when I have a 46" screen to watch it on.

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  183. Wow, people seen very displeased, myself included. Rate increase, and also no android support. BS on the reason. Very interesting on the timing with a Windows phone release. You had to wait until it's release before you made this announcement. You suck. I NEVER thought I would hate your company, but here I am, hoping Amazon, or a new competitor eats your lunch.

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  184. Blockbuster has an app. Pandora tv.com discovery too. hulu is coming. Excuses my friends. Use flash if you can't port silverlight.

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  185. I'm thinking such a universal security standard may not be possible for Android, since it is Linux-based and therefore open-source. When something is open-source, anyone with computer programming skills can crack open the code and manipulate it, no? Yet we do have Napster streaming on Android. I'm not sure if they use DRM or not. These studios really need to get over this DRM crap, knowing that one way or another, hackers WILL get what they want. Present company excluded, of course (and I don't have computer programming skills anyway).

    ReplyDelete

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